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How Long Do You Need To Stay In Canada To Get Your Citizenship?

In today’s blog update we will find out how long you need to stay to get Canadian Citizenship.

In simple terms, one needs to show a stay of at least 3 years out of the last 5 years, but there’s more to it than meets the eye.

For you to become a Canadian citizen, you need to show that you were physically present in Canada for a total of 1095 days out of the five years immediately before you apply for citizenship. But it also needs to be considered that, when it comes to Canadian citizenship eligibility, not all days are considered equal.

According to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), days are not counted as ‘full days’ until and unless an individual is physically present in Canada as a permanent resident. The terms dictate that there need to be at least two years spent as a permanent resident to meet the physical presence requirement.

Every day spent in Canada as a temporary resident will be considered half a day up to 365 days.

It is not required to have lived in Canada as a non-permanent resident for the intention of receiving citizenship. However, it is necessary to know that time as a Temporary Resident only counts as half, so by now, you should know how to calculate your physical presence requirement for Canadian citizenship.

IRCC suggests on its website that you stay physically present in Canada for more than the minimum 1095 days requirement before you apply for citizenship, just to ensure that you are actually eligible for citizenship.

What Are Other Eligibility Conditions For Canadian Citizenship?

Apart from the physical presence requirement, some other eligibility requirements for Canadian citizenship are the following:

You must be proficient in either English or French to be able to communicate in Canadian society easily. If you belong to the age range of 18 – 54, you are required to provide language proficiency evidence.

Any person with a previous criminal record is prohibited from applying for citizenship as laid down by the IRCC.

One must be aware of Canada’s geography and landscapes, have a sound knowledge of its history and political system along with that be mindful of the rights and responsibilities of an ordinary system.

Tax filing by the candidate is necessary for at least three years during the five years before the date you apply.

Moreover, you need to pay a government processing fee, submit a formal application, and also a right of citizenship fee to be considered for a citizenship application.

Once all steps are done, and you meet the eligibility criteria, you can apply for Canadian citizenship, and once approved, applicants between the age of 18 to 54 will have to take a citizenship test.

Furthermore, you will attend a citizenship ceremony and receive a certificate of Canadian citizenship,  followed by taking the Oath of Citizenship. After that, you can officially call yourself a Canadian citizen.

What Are The Physical Presence Conditions Required For Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA) Applicants and Refugee Claimants?

If a work or study permit was granted to you while awaiting the assessment of your refugee claim or PRRA, remember that these documents do not award you with temporary residency. So, you cannot use this period of time in your physical presence calculation.

If you are applying for time as a protected person, the only time limit allowed is the time limit

when you receive a favourable decision on your PRRA application or your claim until the day before becoming a permanent resident. The days you spend in Canada after approval and before your PR is granted count as only half a day toward your citizenship application.

This is the end of today’s blog update. We hope you found this blog useful. Please don’t forget to support us by subscribing to our newsletter and sharing this blog with your friends and family on Facebook, Whatsapp, and Twitter.

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